Product Testing

At Ritchey, all products undergo a strict testing regimen during the development process, as well as random testing during the lifecycle of the product. Fatigue, impact as well as drop tests are performed in-house at the testing facility inside Ritchey Asia located on the 22nd floor, high above Taichung, Taiwan. Ritchey also works very closely with SGS to perform independent 3rd party testing on a regular basis.


FATIGUE TESTING

All Ritchey products are tested to exceed CEN standards (EN 14766 and EN 14781) safety requirements on our testing machines located directly inside the Ritchey Asia product development department. This location gives Ritchey development staff immediate access to all in-house testing equipment during the business day,improves the ability to regularly monitor all testing activity and make any adjustment as needed. Prototypes as well as production samples are fatigue tested 24 hours a day to maintain the highest level of safety, not only in our pre-production prototype products but also to help maintain consistently high quality in all products during normal production.


impact IMPACT TESTING

In-House Impact testing is conduced on all Ritchey forks to exceed the EN safety requirements for impact resistance. This means that a 22.5Kg weight is dropped onto the fork dropouts from various heights simulating a frontal impact. Ritchey forks are regularly tested and tuned during the development process to ensure that in the unfortunate event of a frontal impact, the likelihood of a catastrophic failure is minimized. We consider this to be one of the most crucial tests conduced at our testing facility.


drop DROP TESTING

Although it is not an EN Safety required test, we do also subject both road and mountain handlebars to severe drop testing. Large weights are affixed to the ends of the handlebar, or in the drops in the case of a road bar, and the bar is dropped from various heights onto a solid striker, bringing the bar to an immediate stop and forcing the bar to absorb and dissipate the impact energy. The ability of the handlebar to effectively absorb and dissipate this energy is a key attribute that is used to develop some of the safest handlebars currently available.
At Ritchey, all products undergo a strict testing regimen during the development process, as well as random testing during the lifecycle of the product. Fatigue, impact as well as drop tests are performed in-house at the testing facility inside Ritchey Asia located on the 22nd floor, high above Taichung, Taiwan. Ritchey also works very closely with SGS to perform independent 3rd party testing on a regular basis.
FATIGUE TESTING

All Ritchey products are tested to exceed CEN standards (EN 14766 and EN 14781) safety requirements on our testing machines located directly inside the Ritchey Asia product development department. This location gives Ritchey development staff immediate access to all in-house testing equipment during the business day,improves the ability to regularly monitor all testing activity and make any adjustment as needed. Prototypes as well as production samples are fatigue tested 24 hours a day to maintain the highest level of safety, not only in our pre-production prototype products but also to help maintain consistently high quality in all products during normal production.
impact
IMPACT TESTING

In-House Impact testing is conduced on all Ritchey forks to exceed the EN safety requirements for impact resistance. This means that a 22.5Kg weight is dropped onto the fork dropouts from various heights simulating a frontal impact. Ritchey forks are regularly tested and tuned during the development process to ensure that in the unfortunate event of a frontal impact, the likelihood of a catastrophic failure is minimized. We consider this to be one of the most crucial tests conduced at our testing facility.
drop
DROP TESTING

Although it is not an EN Safety required test, we do also subject both road and mountain handlebars to severe drop testing. Large weights are affixed to the ends of the handlebar, or in the drops in the case of a road bar, and the bar is dropped from various heights onto a solid striker, bringing the bar to an immediate stop and forcing the bar to absorb and dissipate the impact energy. The ability of the handlebar to effectively absorb and dissipate this energy is a key attribute that is used to develop some of the safest handlebars currently available.